All Priests Swear They Never Desire Pu**y.

Ahhhh nemonic’s they’re a great way to remember a list of things, but would get you burned at the stake back in the day for using them. So the title of this post is just that, a nemonic. I learned the power of nemonic’s when I read Derren Brown‘s book ‘Tricks of the Mind’.  After reading the book I then had the ability and still do to remember all 39  works of William Shakespeare in chronological order starting with Two Gentlemen of Verona and Ending with Two Noble Kingsmen, and yes for you experts the debate goes on…

sexy-priest-and-nun-costumes-for-women-outfit-uniform-Adult-Women-Cosplay-fancy-Dress-halloween-costumes.jpg_q50

So back to the topic what the hell are we talking about in regards to our title, well it’s not as seductive a topic as it may seem and hence the need to use nemonic’s to remember the list. Have you ever heard of the OSI model? Open System Intercommunications Model? I don’t blame you and to be honest you probably wont ever have to know what it is or remember it. But for the few of us that do well here’s how I chuckle about the topic and make it easier for me to remember the model and layers as we call them. Oh yes and the nemonic is not my suggestion it was given to me from a close colleague and mentor when I kept failing to remember the model and the different layers and the low level meaning, cheers Mr B.

Here’s the nemonic.

  • All = Application (Layer 7)
  • Priests = Presentation (Layer 6)
  • Swear = Session (Layer 5)
  • They = Transport (Layer 4)
  • Never = Network (Layer 3)
  • Desire = Data (Layer 2)
  • Pussy = Physical (Layer 1)

If you want to know what all the technical jargon is behind this rather rude nemonic, here it is.

The Open Systems Interconnection model (OSI model) is a conceptual model that characterizes and standardizes the communication functions of a telecommunication or computing system without regard to its underlying internal structure and technology. Its goal is the interoperability of diverse communication systems with standard communication protocols. The model partitions a communication system into abstraction layers. The original version of the model had seven layers.

A layer serves the layer above it and is served by the layer below it. For example, a layer that provides error-free communications across a network provides the path needed by applications above it, while it calls the next lower layer to send and receive packets that constitute the contents of that path. Two instances at the same layer are visualized as connected by a horizontal connection in that layer.

The model is a product of the Open Systems Interconnection project at the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

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